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Club, Coach and Volunteer Support

In the UK many millions of children enjoy taking part in sport every week.

At Tees Valley Sport we work with our clubs and workforce to enable them to be safe, effective and child friendly.

It is important that sports clubs and their workforce have a thorough understanding of good practice when coaching young people. Providing children with positive sporting experiences means that they will be more likely to stay involved in sport and achieve their potential. It is the responsibility of everyone to ensure that sports activities are safe and fun!

Below are some documents that may be of use to help you maintain a safe club.

CODE OF ETHICS AND CONDUCT

This details principles of good ethical practice for members of the sports workforce in the Tees Valley

GUIDANCE ON PHYSICAL CONTACT AND YOUNG PEOPLE IN SPORT

This document provides guidance on physical contact for all individuals involved in working with children and young people in sport. It should be used by organisations and clubs to assist in the development of physical contact procedures.

CODES OF CONDUCT FOR CLUBS, COACHES AND VOLUNTEERS

The “Codes of Behaviour Guidance” provides recommendations and good practice advice to providers of sport concerning codes of behaviour for participants, parents, coaches, officials, spectators, administrators, teachers and the media when involved in any sporting activity delivered by the relevant organisation.

MANAGING CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR GUIDELINES

These guidelines aim to promote good practice and to encourage a proactive response to supporting children to manage their own behaviour. They suggest some strategies and sanctions which can be used and also identify unacceptable sanctions or interventions which must never be used by staff or volunteers.

CODES OF BEHAVIOUR GUIDANCE

The “Codes of Behaviour Guidance” provides recommendations and good practice advice to providers of sport concerning codes of behaviour for participants, parents, coaches, officials, spectators, administrators, teachers and the media when involved in any sporting activity delivered by the relevant organisation.

ADDITIONAL VULNERABILITY

Some children may be more vulnerable to abuse and may face more barriers to getting help. This may be because of their race, gender, age, religion or disability, sexual orientation, social background and culture.

DISABLED CHILDREN

Disabled children are particularly vulnerable and at greater risk of all forms of abuse, including abuse whilst being cared for in institutions. The presence of multiple disabilities increases the risk of both abuse and neglect. Disabled children have the same rights to protection as any other child. People caring for and working with disabled children need to be alert to the signs and symptoms of abuse.

RACE AND RACISM

Racism can be a significant factor in cases of abuse. The experience of racism is also likely to affect the responses of the child and family to assessment and enquiry processes. Failure to consider the effects of racism undermines efforts to protect children from other forms of significant harm. The effects of racism differ for different communities and individuals and should not be assumed to be uniform.

Attention should be given to the specific needs of all children. Evidence from research and previous abuse enquiries suggests particular issues for children of mixed parentage and refugee children. The need for neutral, high-quality translation or interpretation services should be taken into account when working with children and families whose preferred language is not English.

All organisations working with children, including those operating in areas where black and minority ethnic communities are numerically small, should address institutional racism defined in the Macpherson Inquiry Report (2000) as ‘the collective failure by an organisation to provide an appropriate and professional service to people on account of their race, culture and/or religion’.

Useful Documents